Rob’s Apothecary – 7 and 8

Oops, I forgot to post yesterday’s sage advice. Wish I had a potion for forgetfulness. So today you get two for one.
BLOOD (Poor or Bad)
Medicine: ‘*Jack Vine tea is the best blood purify you can get. We always made tea out of it when we would be in the swamps’
Medicine: For bad blood, a handful of gum moss, thimbleful of anise seed, a handful of corn shucks, rain water. Steep and take every morning
BOILS
Application: A poultice of catnip leaves for *chigger boils, or flea boils. Or, an infusion of equal part sumac leaves, sage, and *swamp lily roots boiled down. Add a cup of lard to the strained infusion and boil down until the water is out, and use the salve
Application for ordinary boils: Poultice of mashed jimson weed or mashed elderberry leaves
Or: Pounded okra blossoms and sugar will bring boil to a head
To draw a ‘rising’ to a head. Or draw festering splinters out, beat the skin of the tail of a ‘possum and put sugar on it, and apply
* Chigger mites infest human skin via areas of contact with vegetation, such as pant cuffs or shirt sleeves and collars. They migrate on the skin in search of an optimal feeding area. A common myth about chiggers is that they burrow into and remain inside the skin. This is not true. Chiggers insert their feeding structures into the skin and inject enzymes that cause the destruction of host tissue. Hardening of the surrounding skin results in the formation of a feeding tube called a stylostome. Chigger larvae then feed upon the destroyed tissue. If they are not disturbed (which is rarely the case because they cause substantial itching) they may feed through the stylostome for a few days.
 
Chigger mites infest human skin via areas of contact with vegetation, such as pant cuffs or shirt sleeves and collars. They migrate on the skin in search of an optimal feeding area. A common myth about chiggers is that they burrow into and remain inside the skin. This is not true. Chiggers insert their feeding structures into the skin and inject enzymes that cause the destruction of host tissue. Hardening of the surrounding skin results in the formation of a feeding tube called a stylostome. Chigger larvae then feed upon the destroyed tissue. If they are not disturbed (which is rarely the case because they cause substantial itching) they may feed through the stylostome for a
few days
Today’s Music (note all reviews taken from the All Music Guide)
 
3 Hours Pat Midnight – Johnny ‘Guitar’ Watson – 1986 ( mid-’50s catalogue for the Bihari Brothers‘ Flair logo is unassailable, with searing rockers like “Oh Baby,” “Hot Little Mama,” and “Ruben” and the blistering slow blues title cut. Unfortunately, this 16-song collection utilises inferior alternate takes on several of the most important titles. On the positive side, it contains both sides of his rare 1959 single for Class, “One Kiss” b/w “The Bear.”)
Zombified – Southern Culture On The Skids –
Yer’ Album – the James Gang – 1969 (debut LP, Yer’ Album, was very much a first record and very much a record of its time. The heavy rock scene of the period was given to extensive jamming, and four tracks ran more than six minutes each. The group had written some material, but they were still something of a cover band, and the disc included their extended workouts on Buffalo Springfield‘s “Bluebird” and the Yardbirds‘ “Lost Woman,” the latter a nine-minute version complete with lengthy guitar, bass, and drum solos. But in addition to the blues rock there were also touches of pop and progressive rock, mostly from Walsh who displayed a nascent sense of melody, not to mention some of the taste for being a cutup that he would display in his solo career. Walsh‘s “Take a Look Around” must have made an impression on Pete Townshend during the period before the album’s release when the James Gang was opening for the Who since Townshend borrowed it for the music he was writing for the abortive Lifehouse follow-up to Tommy. If “Wrapcity (i.e., Rhapsody) in English,” a minute-long piano and strings interlude, seems incongruous in retrospect, recall that this was an eclectic era. But the otherwise promising “Fred,” which followed, broke down into a pedestrian jazz routine, suggesting that the band was trying to cram too many influences onto one record and sometimes into one song. Nevertheless, they were talented improvisers, as the open-ended album closer, Jerry Ragavoy and Mort Shuman‘s “Stop,” made clear. After ten minutes, Szymczyk faded the track out, but Walsh was still going strong. Yer’ Album contained much to suggest that the James Gang, in particular its guitarist, had a great future, even if it was more an album of performances than compositions.